Ms. Larissa Green » ELA 10 - Common Assessments (CAs)

ELA 10 - Common Assessments (CAs)



CA Preparation for 10th grade 

Hello students!  Want to know what you're required to know how to do and what the tests are like?  It's no secret! Scroll down and take a look.  :)

(Okay, some of the parts of the tests are a little bit secret! shhhh!  The tests may change depending on the content being studied in the class, but the required tasks will generally remain the same.)

Vocabulary Review

Preparation: These vocabulary words must be mastered for CA success, District Periodic Assessments, and CAHSEE preparation.


(Hopefully, it is a review because you learned most, if not all of these terms, in 9th grade.)

 

argument - a series of statements designed to convince the reader of something

claim - aka position, author's opinion - the main idea that the writer is trying to prove; usually expressed in the thesis sentence

connotation - the associations and emotions that have come to be attached to a word

denotation - the literal dictionary definition of a word

counter argument - an opinion that challenges the reasoning behind a claim and attempts to prove it wrong

credibility - the ability to inspire belief or trust; every good persuasive text has this quality


Rhetorical Devices: strategies used to persuade readers

 - logical appeal (logos) - a rhetorical device that attempts to convince based on reason and factual evidence; this is the most important type of strategy to use.  

Logos example: NASA reports that sea ice in the Arctic has been declining at a rate of nine percent per decade for the past 30 years. (Thompson, Elvia. "Recent Warming of Arctice May Affect Worldwide Climate". Retrieved 2 October 2012.)  

 - emotional appeal (pathos) - a rhetorical device that attempts to convince based on emotions such as fear, anger, or sympathy; this may be an effective strategy but can't always be trusted.

Pathos example: Polar bears are dying out because their natural polar habitats are melting away. 

 - ethical appeal (ethos) - a rhetorical device that attempts to convince based on the readers' sense of right and wrong; depends strongly on shared systems of values.

Ethos example: We need to act now to stop global warming, so conserve energy, recycle, and do your part to reduce your carbon footprint.   

 

Evidence:

Types of evidence:

 - allusion - reference to a person, place, or event from literature or history which the reader is meant to be familiar with; may be used to compare two situations and appeal to the readers’ emotions

 - analogies - comparisons that show similarities between facts, ideas, or situations

 - anecdotes - short story, personal example, or observation that helps to prove a point; maybe used to appeal to readers’ emotions

 - case studies - examples or facts from scientific research

 - commonly accepted beliefs - ideas that many people believe to be true; may also refer to values that people share, usually used to support an ethical appeal

 - examples - specific illustrations or instances of a general idea

 - expert opinion - statements made by a recognized authority on a subject

 - facts - statements that can be proven true

 - statistics - facts in the form of numbers

 

Writing Conventions:

 - thesis sentence - describes a subject and gives an opinion

 - topic sentence - the first sentence of a paragraph; makes a general statement in support of the thesis statement

 - concrete detail - evidence that supports the writer's claim

 - commentary - further explanation of a writer's opinion in a paragraph; explains how the concrete details are connected to the topic sentence and thesis


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CA – Thesis Statement

 

FATt / CATt Thesis Statement

 

In persuasive writing, you must choose a side and make a Claim to defend in your essay.  In exposition or literary analysis writing, your essay will have an area of Focus that you will explore, define, or analyze in your essay.  Clarify which type of writing your thesis statement is for as directed by your test administrator:

 

Thesis Type – Circle One:     Persuasion           Exposition        Literary Analysis

(1 point)

 

After reading the assigned text, correctly identify the Title, Author, text type, and state your Focus or Claim for a Thesis Statement. (1 point each)

 

Focus / Claim: __________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

Author: _________________________________________________________

 

 

Title: ___________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

 

text type: ________________________________________________________

 

 

 

Write the sentence below as one complete and coherent FATt / CATt Thesis Statement and make sure you punctuate and capitalize it properly (5 points): 

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________



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CA – Topic Sentence

 

An appropriate topic sentence must include your topic and an opinion or your controlling idea.  The controlling idea is the claim of your essay.  

 

After reading the assigned text, state a claim which could have a Pro and Con side or use the claim provided by your test administrator. (1 point)

 

Claim: __________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

Identify three significant Pro points, which support the Claim, in the assigned text.

Identify three significant Con points, which refute the Claim, in the assigned text.

(3 points)

Pro - Claim

Con – Claim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Based on the Claim and the Pro / Con chart you completed, choose one point from the Pro  / Con chart, relate it to your claim, and compose a topic sentence for an essay body paragraph. Make sure you punctuate and capitalize it properly (5 points): 

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________


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CA – Sentence Types - Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences

 

You need a total score of 11 points to pass this exam.  15 points are possible.

 

Identify the sentence type (1 point each)

Directions: Number your paper 1-5 and write the letter of the answer.

Secret Part!


This part should be a review of your 9th grade Sentence Types ELs. Remember those?

 

 

Directions: On your own paper, after the multiple choice answers, compose your own sentences for the writing prompts 1-5. (2 points per sentence)

 

1. Compose a simple sentence on the subject of teenagers and texting.

 

2. On the subject of teenagers and texting, compose a compound sentence using and, so, or yet.

 

3. On the subject of teenagers and texting, compose a complex sentence that begins with a subordinate clause.

 

4. On the subject of teenagers and texting, compose a complex sentence that ends with a subordinate clause.

 

5. On the subject of teenagers and texting, compose a compound-complex sentence, with one subordinate clause, that uses for, or, nor, or but for the compound part of the sentence. 


(Subjects that you're writing about are subject to change!)


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CA – Citing Evidence

 

Assessment Vocabulary

Cite:                        to say or write the words of (a book, author etc.)

to mention (something) especially as an example or to support an idea or opinion.

Writing a piece of evidence down is citing it, which is also known as quoting.

 

Embed:                   to place or set (something) firmly in something else

Citations need to be embedded, introduced or explained, within a sentence to belong in a paragraph.

 

In this Common Assessment, you will need to correctly cite relevant evidence to support a claim and a counterclaim.   The focus of this exam is demonstrating the correct format for citations.  11 points are needed to pass this assessment.

 

After reading the assigned text, state a claim or use the claim provided for you by your testing administrator. (1 point)

 

Claim: ________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

______________________________________________________________________

 

Correctly write 2 embedded quotes with appropriately placed punctuation, capitalization, and parenthetical citations that support the claim.  You may use an ellipsis sparingly.  If you do, your sentence must still make sense with text omitted.  Be careful with your format when quoting dialogue or using bracketed changes.  (4 points)

 

 

1. ______________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

2. ______________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

 

Consider the opposite point of view.  State a counterclaim for your claim or use the counterclaim provided for you by your testing administrator. (1 point)

 

Counterclaim:  ___________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

 

Correctly write an embedded quote with appropriately placed punctuation, capitalization, and parenthetical citation that supports the counterclaim.  You may use an ellipsis sparingly.  If you do, your sentence must still make sense with text omitted.  Be careful with your format when quoting dialogue or using bracketed changes.  (4 points)

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 

________________________________________________________________

 


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So, that is basically it.  All students need to be able to do all these things to write properly.  They are basic skill tests required for essay composition.  The order the tests are given may not reflect the way they are listed above.  As CAs are changed or added to, this page will be updated.