Ms. Larissa Green » 10th grade - Culture Essay

10th grade - Culture Essay

10th grade Culture Essay

Texts: "Everyday Use" p. 58 and "Two Ways to Belong in America" p. 70

Note: The extra space between paragraphs is an error of the website format.  Do not double the spaces between paragraphs.

Writing Prompt: The two sets of sisters you have encountered in the last two texts include one sister who braces her background and another who assimilates to a new culture.  Choose one pair of girls (those who embrace their background or those who assimilate), and write an essay in which you explain their attitudes to a culture. Be sure to:

·        Choose an organizational structure suitable for the subject

·        Write a clear thesis that identifies your chosen set of characters and their similarities or differences

·        Include textual evidence quotations to support your explanations (at least one from each text)

·        Cite the author of the work you are quoting in parentheses following the quotation. (Mukherjee 71) or (Walker 65)


 

Essay Outline for Compare/Contrast– in the Writing Section of your Comp. Books

I. Introduction

            A. Hook – intro the topic of culture staying the same & changing for the story and essay

            B. FATt Thesis – (example: In Alice Walker’s story, “Everyday Use” and Bharati Mukherjee’s essay, “Two Ways to Belong in America,” the pairing of Maggie and Mira show two women who cling to their original cultures while Bharati and Dee both embrace mainstream America.) Choose your diction carefully ‘cling’ is a negative connotation while ‘embrace’ is a positive connotation.  This thesis works best for supporting Bharati and Dee.

II. Body Paragraph 1: Sister One: Accepting / Celebrating heritage

            A. “Everyday Use” (Maggie) and “Two Ways to Belong in America” (Mira)

            B. What is the evidence that each celebrates her heritage? How do their acceptances of heritage differ?

            C. Commentary / Analysis

III. Body Paragraph 2: Sister Two: Assimilating to a new culture

            A. Dee in “Everyday Use” and Bharati in “Two Ways to Belong in America”          

            B. What is the evidence that each assimilates to a new culture?  What is each sister’s attitude toward her heritage? Toward her new culture?

            C. Commentary / Analysis

IV. Conclusion

            A. Restate thesis

            B. Closure

 

Evidence and Commentary Examples - (Answer the questions in your commentary):

 

Dee told her sister Maggie, “it’s really a new day for us” (Walker 65).  Dee embraced mainstream American life and all the opportunities it provided for her.  She wanted to be well educated and to have choices in her life.  She saw Maggie as someone left behind in her past, who was stuck in her culture.

 Bharati made up her mind to marry an American man and she, “welcomed the strain that came with marrying outside my ethnic community” (Mukherjee 70). She knew that her sister, Mira, wanted avoid such challenges and was happy to marry the Indian man she met in college.  It is not that Bharati did not like her Indian culture; she just wanted new challenges in her life.


 

Evidence Peer Review

Read your peer’s evidence and commentary – answer in complete sentences:

-         1. Is their evidence embedded in a sentence?

-         2. Did they include the Author’s last name and page number?

-         3. Are there at least 2 sentences of commentary / analysis?

-              3. a. Does the analysis / commentary answer II. B and III. B? 

 

Dee told her sister Maggie, “it’s really a new day for us” (Walker 65).  Dee embraced mainstream American life and all the opportunities it provided for her.  She wanted to be well educated and to have choices in her life.  She saw Maggie as someone left behind in her past, who was stuck in her culture.


Team Discussion Prep for a Socratic Seminar p. 58 & p. 70

Team ‘Merica

Bharati and Dee

Team Home Heritage

Maggie and Mira

What is the evidence that each assimilates to a new culture? 

 

 

What is each sister’s attitude toward her heritage?

 

 

What is each sister’s attitude toward her new culture?

What is the evidence that each celebrates her heritage?

 

 

How do their acceptances of heritage differ?

 

 

 

What is their view towards American mainstream culture?

 

Include page numbers for where your evidence comes from.  Remember to prepare questions to ask the other team and ask the other team clarify their responses as needed.


Culture Essay - First Draft

            Many different cultures live in the United States.  Some have chosen to come here for a new life, some just come for education opportunities, and others have families who have lived here for generations.  In Alice Walker’s story, “Everyday Use” and Bharati Mukherjee’s essay, “Two Ways to Belong in America,” the pairing of Maggie and Mira show two women who cling to their original cultures while Bharati and Dee both embrace mainstream America.

            The character Dee in Walker’s story and Bharati Mukherjee both sought to assimilate to American culture. For Bharati, her decision to stay in America and be American, instead of returning to India, came with her decision to marry. Bharati made up her mind to marry an American man and she, “welcomed the strain that came with marrying outside my ethnic community” (Mukherjee 70). She knew that her sister, Mira, wanted avoid such challenges and was happy to marry the Indian man she met in college.  It is not that Bharati did not like her Indian culture; she just wanted new challenges in her life. Bharati could have returned to India and lived comfortable as she came from a high status background; however, the character Dee resented her impoverished upbringing.  Dee was well educated and could not wait to leave her home.  Dee was so embarrassed of her family that she once wrote to her mother, “no matter where you “choose” to live” she would come to see them but would not bring her friends (Walker 60).  Yet Dee did come home to visit, with a friend, in order to collect valuable antiques.  To her, her heritage became something of value only because old, handmade items and folk art now had value in modern American culture.

            In contrast to Bharati and Dee, Bharati’s sister Mira loved her Indian heritage and the character Maggie had accepted her humble Southern country background.  Mira was angered by the idea that she would have to become a citizen to remain in the United States.  She had already lived in America for over 30 years, earned a degree, and contributed to her field of pre-school education.  She had been invited to “stay and work here because of her talent” and now she was being treated like an outsider instead of an honored guest (Mukherjee 71).  In “Everyday Use” Dee told her sister Maggie, “it’s really a new day for us” (Walker 65).  She saw Maggie as someone left behind in her past, who was stuck in her culture. Dee had embraced the future through mainstream America and thought her sister should as well.  But, Maggie never looked for or hoped for anything more than her life as a simple, African-American farmer. Although poor and deprived of many of the things her sister had, “this was the way she knew God to work” (Walker 65).  It was not that she would not have enjoyed a better life, but she was very comfortable with her life the way it was.  Maggie was very shy, especially with her burn scars, and her country-style heritage was safe for her.

            The juxtaposition of Bharati and Dee against Maggie and Mira show sharp differences between embracing the change of joining mainstream America and sticking to what one knows.  Bharati was happy to change and Dee embraced the new day with American Civil Rights.  While Mira always was and always would be Indian by choice, Maggie really did not know any better.  But, with her shy ways, even if given a choice, Maggie would probably choose to stay home in the South with the people she knew.

 


Culture Essay - Revised Draft

            Many different cultures live in the United States.  Some have chosen to come here for a new life, some just come for education opportunities, and others have families who have lived here for generations.  In Alice Walker’s story, “Everyday Use” and Bharati Mukherjee’s essay, “Two Ways to Belong in America,” the pairing of Maggie and Mira show two women who cling to their original cultures while Bharati and Dee both embrace mainstream America.

            The character Dee in Walker’s story and Bharati Mukherjee both sought to assimilate to American culture. For Bharati, her decision to stay in America and be American, instead of returning to India, came with her decision to marry. Bharati made up her mind to marry an American man and she, “welcomed the strain that came with marrying outside my ethnic community” (Mukherjee 70). She knew that her sister, Mira, wanted avoid such challenges and was happy to marry the Indian man she met in college.  It is not that Bharati did not like her Indian culture; she just wanted new challenges in her life. Bharati could have returned to India and lived comfortably as she came from a high status background; however, the character Dee resented her impoverished upbringing.  Dee was well educated and could not wait to leave her home.  Dee was so embarrassed of her family that she once wrote to her mother, “no matter where you “choose” to live” she would come to see them but would not bring her friends (Walker 60).  Yet Dee did come home to visit, with a friend, in order to collect valuable antiques.  To her, her heritage became something of value only because old, handmade items and folk art now have value in modern American culture.

            In contrast to Bharati and Dee, Bharati’s sister Mira loved her Indian heritage and the character Maggie had accepted her humble Southern country background.  Mira was angered by the idea that she would have to become a citizen to remain in the United States.  She had already lived in America for over 30 years, earned a degree, and contributed to her field of pre-school education.  She had been invited to “stay and work here because of her talent” and now she was being treated like an outsider instead of an honored guest (Mukherjee 71).  While in “Everyday Use” the modern and progressive Dee told her sister Maggie, “it’s really a new day for us” (Walker 65).  She saw Maggie as someone left behind in her past, who was stuck in her culture. Dee had embraced the future through mainstream America and thought her sister should as well.  But, Maggie never looked for or hoped for anything more than her life as a simple, African-American farmer. Although poor and deprived of many of the things her sister had, “this was the way she knew God to work” (Walker 65).  It was not that she would not have enjoyed a better life, but she was very comfortable with her life the way it was.  Maggie was very shy, especially with her burn scars, and her country-style heritage was safe for her.

            The juxtaposition of Bharati and Dee against Maggie and Mira show sharp differences between embracing the change of joining mainstream America and sticking to what one knows.  Bharati was happy to change and adapt her Indian heritage and Dee embraced the new day for African-Americans with new Civil Rights.  While Mira always was and always would be Indian by choice, Maggie really did not know any better.  But, with her shy ways, even if given a choice, Maggie would probably choose to stay home in the South with the people she knew.


 

Culture Essay

            Many different cultures live in the United States.  Some have chosen to come here for a new life, some just come for education opportunities, and others have families who have lived here for generations.  In Alice Walker’s story, “Everyday Use” and Bharati Mukherjee’s essay, “Two Ways to Belong in America,” the pairing of Maggie and Mira show two women who cling to their original cultures while Bharati and Dee both embrace mainstream America.

            The character Dee in Walker’s story and Bharati Mukherjee both sought to assimilate to American culture. For Bharati, her decision to stay in America and be American, instead of returning to India, came with her decision to marry. Bharati made up her mind to marry an American man and she, “welcomed the strain that came with marrying outside my ethnic community” (Mukherjee 70). She knew that her sister, Mira, wanted avoid such challenges and was happy to marry the Indian man she met in college.  It is not that Bharati did not like her Indian culture; she just wanted new challenges in her life. Bharati could have returned to India and lived comfortably as she came from a high status background; however, the character Dee resented her impoverished upbringing.  Dee was well educated and could not wait to leave her home.  Dee was so embarrassed of her family that she once wrote to her mother, “no matter where you “choose” to live” she would come to see them but would not bring her friends (Walker 60).  Yet Dee did come home to visit, with a friend, in order to collect valuable antiques.  To her, her heritage became something of value only because old, handmade items and folk art now have value in modern American culture.

            In contrast to Bharati and Dee, Bharati’s sister Mira loved her Indian heritage and the character Maggie had accepted her humble Southern country background.  Mira was angered by the idea that she would have to become a citizen to remain in the United States.  She had already lived in America for over 30 years, earned a degree, and contributed to her field of pre-school education.  She had been invited to “stay and work here because of her talent” and now she was being treated like an outsider instead of an honored guest (Mukherjee 71).  While in “Everyday Use” the modern and progressive Dee told her sister Maggie, “it’s really a new day for us” (Walker 65).  She saw Maggie as someone left behind in her past, who was stuck in her culture. Dee had embraced the future through mainstream America and thought her sister should as well.  But, Maggie never looked for or hoped for anything more than her life as a simple, African-American farmer. Although poor and deprived of many of the things her sister had, “this was the way she knew God to work” (Walker 65).  It was not that she would not have enjoyed a better life, but she was very comfortable with her life the way it was.  Maggie was very shy, especially with her burn scars, and her country-style heritage was safe for her.

            The juxtaposition of Bharati and Dee against Maggie and Mira show sharp differences between embracing the change of joining mainstream America and sticking to what one knows.  Bharati was happy to change and adapt her Indian heritage and Dee embraced the new day for African-Americans with new Civil Rights.  While Mira always was and always would be Indian by choice, Maggie really did not know any better.  But, with her shy ways, even if given a choice, Maggie would probably choose to stay home in the South with the people she knew.